Tips for funding your bricks-and-mortar historic preservation project

By Anne Raines, Deputy Director, MHT

Our recent warm spell has been a welcome reminder that spring is just around the corner.  For those of us who are involved with historic buildings, spring means more than just crocuses and daffodils – it means repairs and maintenance!  Many historic property owners across the state are looking for funding this time of year, so MHT put together this primer on the basics of preservation funding for your bricks-and-mortar project.

FUNDING OPTIONS

MHT administers several grant and loan programs which assist what we refer to as “capital” (bricks-and-mortar) preservation activities.

  • MHT Historic Preservation Loan Program: The program provides low-interest loans for rehabilitation, acquisition, refinancing or predevelopment costs. MHT typically funds one to three projects a year for borrowers including nonprofit organizations, local governments, businesses and individuals, with preference given to projects with a high level of public benefit.  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Key considerations: Loan amount will generally not exceed $300,000; property must be National Register listed or eligible for listing; conveyance of a perpetual preservation easement is required; business and individual applicants must demonstrate inability to secure funding on the private market.

Contact: Anne Raines, Deputy Director, MHT.

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Leeke Academy, in Baltimore’s Fells Point neighborhood, received MHT Loan Program, MHT Capital Grant Program, and MHAA funding for a complete restoration.

  • African American Heritage Preservation Program (AAHPP): The AAHPP provides grants for acquisition, rehabilitation, new construction, and certain predevelopment costs (such as architect’s or engineer’s fees) for projects related to African American heritage. Projects are not required to be designated as “historic”.  Applicants can include nonprofit organizations, local governments, businesses and individuals, with preference given to projects with a high level of public benefit.  Dollar-for-dollar match is required except for nonprofit applicants.  Application deadline is July 15.

Key considerations: Grant amount will not exceed $100,000 per project per year; if the assisted property is National Register listed or eligible for listing, then conveyance of a perpetual preservation easement is required.

Contact: (For technical preservation issues) Anne Raines, Deputy Director, MHT; (for project scope and purpose) Maya Davis, Interim Director, Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture.

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Kennard School in Centreville received AAHPP, MHAA, and MHT Capital Grant funding and is now in use as a community center.

  • Maryland Heritage Areas Authority (MHAA) Grants: Grants of up to $100,000, with a required one-to-one match of non-state support, are available for capital projects, which can include acquisition, development (repair or alteration of an existing building, structure or site; or new construction), rehabilitation, restoration, and pre-development costs. Projects must be related to heritage tourism and located within one of the state’s 13 Certified Heritage Areas.  Only nonprofit organizations and government entities are eligible to apply. An Intent to Apply form is due at the end of January.

Key considerations:  Due to the competitive nature of the program, grants for capital projects average $54,000; the conveyance of a perpetual preservation easement may be required on certain historic properties.

Contact:  Find your local heritage area contact using the map and links here: http://mht.maryland.gov/heritageareas.shtml. You can also contact Jen Ruffner, Maryland Heritage Areas Program.

  • Maryland Heritage Areas Authority (MHAA) Loans: Loans are available to nonprofit organizations, local jurisdictions, individuals and businesses to assist with the preservation of heritage resources and the enhancement of heritage attractions and visitor services located within a Certified Heritage Area. Eligible activities include acquisition, development, rehabilitation, restoration, leasehold improvements, and purchase of equipment, furnishings, and inventory.  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Key considerations:  The maximum loan commitment made for any specific project is limited by the available uncommitted balance of the MHAA Financing Fund.  Up to 50 percent of the total project cost will be provided based on an assessment of the applicant’s financial need.

Contact:  Jen Ruffner, Maryland Heritage Areas Program.

  • MHT Historic Preservation (Capital) Grant Program: After a long hiatus, we might be able to welcome the return of Capital Grant funding in FY2018.  The program provides grants to nonprofit organizations, local jurisdictions, individuals and businesses for acquisition, rehabilitation, and pre-development costs related to properties listed on or eligible for the National Register.  The conveyance of a perpetual preservation easement is required for all assisted projects.  Dollar-for-dollar match is required except for nonprofit applicants.  If funding for the program is provided, additional information about the application process will be available on our grants main page in May 2017.

In addition to these programs, we often direct our partners and constituents toward the following programs based on their project-specific needs:

Finally, MHT’s own handout on Potential Funding Sources for Heritage Preservation Projects, which has recently been updated, covers a range of options available from national and private sources.

PITCHING YOUR PROJECT TO FUNDERS

Now that we’ve identified some options for funding, the next step is to write an application.  In our grant workshops, we often provide a tip sheet for grant writing in general.  However, for this post we wanted to provide some additional insights about how to think through, develop, and explain a rehabilitation or construction project in the context of a grant or loan application.

First, it is important for you to be clear about the basic parameters of the project.

  • What kind of project are you undertaking? (Acquisition, refinancing, rehabilitation, new construction, predevelopment?)
  • What is the scope of the entire project from start to finish? (Is it as simple as a roof replacement, or is it a complicated multi-phase rehabilitation project costing many millions of dollars?)
  • What will the entire project cost? (You may need to hire an architect or project manager to help estimate costs for a very large project.  If you are undertaking a smaller project, we generally recommend that you obtain at least one price proposal in order to make an accurate grant application.)

Next, you need to determine what funding options are available to you.

  • What funding sources & resources are available for your specific project and applicant type?
  • Is it advantageous for your application to break down the project into phases and apply for each phase individually, as you are ready to undertake it?
  • Will you need more than one grant? Are you expecting multiple, sequential grants from the same program?  Funders always like to see that applicants are trying to secure funding from diverse sources – including their own fundraising.

Once you are writing a grant application, you will need to develop a clear scope of work – what are you including in the scope of this particular grant request?  What isn’t included?

  • Define a project that meaningfully relates to the grant amount: break it down. Typically a grant application will be more successful if it allows the completion of one discrete work item than if it provides for only partial progress toward one or more items.
  • Have a plan for how you will pay for any required matching funds and other costs that are necessary to complete the project. Funders want to know that you will be able to complete the whole project successfully.
  • Develop a meaningful and reasonable project schedule or timeline. What work can you reasonably accomplish within the specified grant performance period?  (Most grants are time-sensitive and have specific beginning and ending dates.)  According to your project timeline, are you READY for a grant?
  • Will your organization be able to manage the project (and the potential grant), or do you need to hire a project manager or architect? Know what expertise the project requires and assemble a strong project team.

Finally, convince the funder that they should fund you. Most funding programs are very competitive, and it is up to you to demonstrate that your project is important, and that it needs to happen NOW.

  • How do your goals reflect those of the funder? Don’t feel embarrassed to write about your larger goals and aspirations.
  • Be convincing about the significance and urgency of the project.
  • Review and understand the program’s selection criteria. Address them clearly and concisely!
  • Show your commitment to the project: how will it be sustained into the future? (How will you protect the investment that you are asking the funder to make?)
  • Show the funder that you have cultivated widespread support for your project from:
    • the community
    • your local, state, and federal representatives
    • any local, state, or federal agencies that may be involved
    • other organizations that may have similar goals

Now that you know what funding possibilities are out there, and you know what funders are looking for in an application, why not get started?  Can your project really wait another year?

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Charles Sumner GAR Post #25 in Chestertown in 2001, before its rehabilitation using MHT Capital, AAHPP, and MHAA grant funds.

 

 

 

Interpretation at Sotterley Plantation: The Road to Relevance

By Jeanne Pirtle, Education Director, Historic Sotterley, Inc.

Historic Sotterley Plantation has a long history, to be sure. It has also been open to the public as a museum since 1960.  Let’s see, what was happening in the 1960’s? Schools were still segregated. Jim Crow was still alive.  And in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, Sotterley’s last private owner had decided to open Sotterley and create a non-profit so that it could be preserved.  As with most house museums at that time, the early tours focused on the furnishings and lives of the owners with a little legend, lore and myth mixed in.  After the owner’s death in 1993, ownership went to the Sotterley Foundation, which is now Historic Sotterley, Inc.

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In the early 1970’s, a visitor and her father came to the museum.  They paid their two dollars for a tour.  They noticed a slave cabin on the property, but on their tour of the house nothing was mentioned about the slave cabin.  The visitor was Agnes Kane Callum.

Agnes was born in Baltimore in 1925.  She had raised her family while working for the post office. After retirement she earned two degrees from Morgan State University.  She continued to research her family and found a connection to Sotterley.  Her ancestors, Hillary and Elsa Cane, were enslaved there in the 19th century. Agnes made it her passion and mission to have the story of her family told in Sotterley’s narrative. She kept visiting Sotterley with research in hand, bringing large groups of her family and friends with her.  Eventually, Agnes became a trustee on Sotterley’s board and developed an education program for middle school students that is still taught today, Slavery to Freedom.

In 1996, Sotterley was on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “11 Most Endangered” list.  Agnes joined forces with owner descendants to save Sotterley. It was rescued and grant money was used to help restore the house and cabin. For some years, tours focused on this restoration with a few stories of the enslaved, but still it was not a complete and inclusive narrative.

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Sotterley’s slave cabin

In 2010, with grant funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Sotterley began work on a re-interpretation and developed research-based tours that moved past the romanticism to reveal a realistic view of the plantation’s story seen through different perspectives.  An exhibit in the slave cabin, as well as other projects focused on changing perspectives in interpretation at Sotterley, were assisted by grants from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority.  In 2012, Sotterley was recognized as a port site through the Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP).  In 2014, Land, Lives and Labor became Historic Sotterley Plantation’s first permanent exhibit created to focus on the people who lived and labored for the owners from 1699 into the mid 20th century.  It is housed in the Corn Crib, which was restored using funding from the African American Heritage Preservation Program, administered by MHT and the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture.

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“Land, Lives, and Labor” exhibit, housed in the Corn Crib

Agnes Kane Callum passed away in 2015.  Sotterley will remember her life and legacy as we dedicate the new Slave Cabin exhibit to her memory this April.  This exhibit will focus on the lives of her ancestors, Hillary and Alice Elsa Cane and their children and allow visitors to experience a window into their lives.

At Historic Sotterley, we continue to tell the stories of all who lived and worked here, as we remember our roots and the people who helped us along the way, not just in February, but every day. We welcome every visitor who anticipates a new discovery and finds relevance in our collective past.

A Fond Farewell to Roz Racanello

By Maryland Historical Trust Staff

Not long after the State of Maryland certified the Southern Maryland Heritage Area in July 2003, Roslyn “Roz” Racanello saw a job ad for an Executive Director of a new heritage preservation and tourism organization serving Charles, Calvert and St. Mary’s Counties. She wasn’t sure what a “Heritage Area” was exactly, but she thought her background in the arts, marketing and communications, planning and partnership building, and fundraising and advocacy might be a good fit. Having recently moved to Maryland from the New York City region, she had worked largely in the private sector doing creative and design work with world renowned firms such as Time-Warner, Readers Digest, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Steering Committee recognized Roz’s skills and hired her to build Maryland’s sixth Heritage Area from the ground up.

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Roz Racanello with North Beach Mayor Bojokles in 2010

Under Roz’s leadership, the Southern Maryland Heritage Area worked with partners to secure over $5.4 million of grants and matching funding for heritage preservation and tourism projects in the three-county region. She played a leading role in the creation of the Religious Freedom National Scenic Byway, now managed by the Southern Maryland Heritage Area, and recently served as principal staff to the Steering Committee for the development of a Piscataway Indian Heritage Trail. For these and many other projects, in 2010 she received a Governor’s Award for her outstanding work in Cultural Heritage Tourism from the Office of Tourism Development, and another Cultural Heritage Tourism Award in 2014 for the publication Destination Southern Maryland: A Regional Guide to War of 1812 Events.

S Md 1812 Guide

This award-winning publication helped steer residents and visitors to tourism offerings in Southern Maryland.

For nine years Roz also served as Chair of the Maryland Coalition of Heritage Areas, the independent professional organization of Maryland’s 13 State-certified Heritage Areas. In this role, she was a highly effective and respected spokesperson, representing the organizations with the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority that governs the overall program. Her efforts with the Office of the Governor and the Maryland Legislature helped secure full State funding of $3 million annually. Her professional knowledge and innovative approaches also made her a highly sought-after and valued Board member of over a dozen government and non-profit organizations, including the Executive Directors Council of the Maryland Tourism Development Board; the Maryland Historical Trust’s PreserveMaryland Steering Committee; and the Star-Spangled 200 War of 1812 Bicentennial Events, Programs and Grant Review Committee. As a member of the Preservation Maryland-led Tobacco Barns Summit Coalition, she helped distribute Save America’s Treasures grants to save 30 endangered historic tobacco barns.

RRacanello MHAA CakeBefore retiring this summer, Roz attended the July 7, 2016 meeting of the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, which awarded her a Certificate of Appreciation, as did the Maryland Coalition of Heritage Areas. Last month she was also honored by Maryland Governor Larry Hogan with a Citation in recognition of her thirteen years of outstanding service to the people of Maryland. She will be missed at the Maryland Historical Trust, and we thank her for all that she’s done to promote preservation and heritage tourism in our state.

Cumberland’s Youth Summit

By Kathy McKenney, Historic Planner/Preservation Coordinator, City of Cumberland

With a Certified Local Government grant from the Maryland Historical Trust, the Cumberland Historic Preservation Commission and staff have partnered with Braddock Middle School to develop a first-ever Youth Summit. During the 2015-2016 school year, this project is bringing together local youth, educators, and preservation partners to investigate and engage with historic places in our city. The summit will give participating students real-world experience with a day focused on hands-on preservation maintenance and intensive sessions on using architecture as artifact, archival research, and place-based interpretation. Summit participants will visit, discuss, and analyze designated historic sites such as churches, the C&O Canal, and the Footer Dye Works Building. The students will craft stories about these places for their peers and the community at large. Project partners include the City of Cumberland’s Historic Preservation Commission, Allegany College of Maryland, the National Park Service C&O Canal National Historical Park, and Canal Place Preservation and Development Authority.

Cumberland Youth Summit 1

Visit to Dan’s Rock

On October 16, 2015, eighth grade students traveled to Dan’s Rock to understand cultural landscapes and to begin learning more about their community, while discussing “sense of place” and what places were important to them within their community. They began to interpret the layers of human visitation to the site over the years and asked other visitors to the site about their experiences and what drew them there. The students developed a hashtag to begin using for social media posting: #SaveOurHistory #BraddockSummit2015.

On October 23rd, students, accompanied by a staff member from Cumberland’s Economic Development department, traveled to five Cumberland neighborhoods (Dingle, Decatur Heights, Johnson Heights, White Oaks, and Rolling Mill) to learn more about cultural and architectural resources. They visited sites both with and without formal designation, such the city’s working class neighborhoods ranging from mid-nineteenth century to mid- century modern. Students selected a neighborhood for further research and are now learning more about documenting resources. The students will craft stories about these places for their peers and the community at large.

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Youth Summit Neighborhood Visits – Decatur Heights

On November 20th, members of the project team, as well as staff from the Allegany County Library System, met with the students in the classroom to introduce them to sources for continuing their neighborhood research. Their research will result in the preparation of a report that they will present to the Cumberland Mayor and City Council at a public meeting in the near future. In the spring of 2016, students will participate in activities including a service learning project in and around Canal Place, a hands-on preservation maintenance opportunity and an additional heritage tourism activity. We’re looking forward to the results of this great program!

For more information, please contact Kathy McKenney, Historic Planner/Preservation Coordinator, at 301-759-6431 or kathy.mckenney@cumberland.md.gov.

Documenting the Civil Rights Movement in Baltimore

By Eli Pousson, Director of Preservation and Outreach, Baltimore Heritage

Over the past year, Baltimore Heritage, the Maryland Historical Trust and the Baltimore National Heritage Area have been hard at work researching and documenting the history of Baltimore’s African American Civil Rights movement. Our long-term goal is to identify and designate historic places associated with the Civil Rights movement in and around Baltimore City. From the start, we recognized this project as a unique opportunity to get Baltimore residents interested and involved in the search for the city’s Civil Rights history.

In the spring, we put together a comprehensive bibliography with journal articles, books, government reports, and more—using Zotero to publish the bibliography online as a resource for local historians and educators. In the fall, we launched our project website featuring an interactive timeline of Civil Rights history and an inventory map showing all of the sites and buildings we have found so far. If you think we missed any important events or places, please get in touch or you can comment directly on the timeline or inventory as Google Spreadsheets.

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Rally to Save Baltimore’s Civil Rights Heritage, November 2015. Photo by Eli Pousson.

In addition to these online resources, we’ve organized several tours and programs for Baltimore residents and local students. In November we led a bike tour with stops at the segregated Pool No. 2 in Druid Hill Park, the home of activists Juanita Jackson and Clarence M. Mitchell, Jr. on Druid Hill Avenue, and the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge on Eutaw Place where Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke in 1964. We also led a tour for a group of students from Digital Harbor High School with stops at the Ebenezer AME Church and Leadenhall Baptist—two of the oldest African American churches in Baltimore with long histories of fighting for justice.

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Juanita Jackson and Clarence Mitchell House on Druid Hill Avenue. Photo by Eli Pousson.

Our research has uncovered powerful stories from fight against residential housing segregation in the 1910s, the campaign desegregate downtown lunch counters in the 1950s, and activism around economic empowerment and urban renewal in the 1970s. But we know there are many more stories and places that we still need to learn more about. We look forward to continuing our research and working with community residents (and veteran activists) to make sure we preserve these important places from Maryland’s Civil Rights history.

If you are interested in learning more Baltimore’s Civil Rights Heritage: Looking for Landmarks from the Movement, please sign up for updates through the Baltimore Heritage website or get in touch with Eli Pousson, Director of Preservation and Outreach at pousson@baltimoreheritage.org.

Guest Blog – Bells Across the Land: Remembering Appomattox

 

By Nick Redding, Executive Director, Preservation Maryland

Bells Across the LandOn April 9, 1865, after four years of combat, the Civil War came to a symbolic end in the tiny hamlet of Appomattox, Virginia when Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant. The surrender at Appomattox signaled the end of the long, harsh conflict which ultimately claimed the lives of 750,000 individuals and led to the emancipation of the nearly 4.5 million enslaved African-Americans held in the southern states, including Maryland.

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Maryland Heritage Areas Grants Workshops and Webinar – Register Today!

Cove Point Light and Keeper's House

Cove Point Light and Keeper’s House

 

It’s that time of year again!

Are you located in a Certified Heritage Area?

Are you interested in learning more about grants that are available for capital and non-capital projects relating to the preservation of historical, archeological, natural and cultural resources and heritage tourism?

If so, you will want to attend one of two upcoming grant workshops or a grants webinar that are being offered by the Maryland Heritage Areas Program. These sessions are an opportunity to learn more about the FY 2016 grant program and the new online application process.  You will also be able to ask any questions you may have about the program, or a project you are considering. Continue reading