Using the National Register to Connect Baltimore City Students with Neighborhood History (Guest Blog)

By Jeff Buchheit, Executive Director, Baltimore National Heritage Area

Since 2016, the Baltimore National Heritage Area (BNHA) has partnered with the Maryland Historical Trust and Baltimore Heritage (the city’s preservation advocacy organization) on a project that engages Baltimore City Public School students in an exploration of their local history using the research standards and processes necessary in developing nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Through the project, students investigate Baltimore’s significant role in the Civil Rights Movement and the people and places that reflect this critical time in U.S. and Maryland history.

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Baltimore School of the Arts students prepare for their upcoming field trip.

The heritage area’s primary role is to help teachers and their students connect to historic sites and resources for researching the Civil Rights Movement. Key partner sites have included the Maryland Historical Society and the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum, which operates under the stewardship of Morgan State University.

Initial planning meetings brought together the BNHA, Baltimore Heritage, Baltimore City Public Schools, the Maryland Historical Society, and the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum. A handful of Baltimore City Public Schools teachers were identified based on their classroom studies in African American history and the Civil Rights Movement. Those teachers attended an October 2017 workshop during which Baltimore Heritage Executive Director Johns Hopkins provided an overview of the National Register nomination process. Following the presentation, the teachers toured the collections of the Maryland Historical Society and the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum. At the end of the workshop, teachers scheduled nine field trips, five of which took place in the fall of 2017.

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Baltimore Heritage’s Johns Hopkins talks to students at the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum.

Perhaps the key takeaway for the students on the field trips has been their exposure to the use of primary documents in research, and the phenomenal contributions (past and present) of Baltimore citizens in the Civil Rights Movement. The heritage area is meeting its overarching goal too: raising student awareness and pride in their history and their neighborhoods. Students have been very engaged, and the teachers are asking “What else can we do together?” — a real win-win for everyone.

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Experience Maryland Archeology First Hand at Patterson Park

By Charlie Hall, State Terrestrial Archeologist

What better way to celebrate Maryland Archeology Month than by doing archeology in Maryland!

Imagine it’s September of 1814 and the British, having burned Washington just a few weeks earlier, are on their way to Baltimore.  Fort McHenry stands ready to defend the harbor from attack by the British fleet.  A 3-mile wide earthwork with 100 cannon and more than 10,000 regular, local militia, and irregulars, are in place to repulse the anticipated land attack.  Surprised by the strength of Baltimore’s defenses, the British eventually flee the field of battle.  Most Americans remember the event best through Francis Scott Key’s Star Spangled Banner.  But you have an opportunity to get close to the battle by helping archeologists investigate the War of 1812 fortifications in East Baltimore’s Patterson Park!

Rodger’s Bastion on Hampstead Hill, from the Patterson Park pagoda, Baltimore (https://www.flickr.com/photos/monumentcity/5781863781/in/photostream/)

Rodger’s Bastion on Hampstead Hill, from the Patterson Park pagoda, Baltimore

Sponsored by Baltimore Heritage, with financial support from the Maryland Heritage Areas Program, archeologists from The Louis Berger Group will supervise a cadre of volunteers every Tuesday through Saturday from April 15th until May 17th.  You can volunteer for all 25 days, or for any portion down to a single morning or afternoon.  Pre-registration is required, and it’s easy!  Simply go to the Baltimore Heritage website  and click the blue button labeled “Register as a fieldwork volunteer” (toward the bottom of the page).  Complete the on-line form and answer a few questions about your availability, experience, and interests, and then click “Submit”.  That’s it!  You’ll be contacted by someone associated with the project to schedule your volunteer time.

No experience is necessary.  Free street parking can be found nearby.  There are plenty of great eateries in the area.

Still not sure?  You might want to attend a Volunteer Workshop hosted by Baltimore Heritage on April 15th from 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM.  Light refreshments will be provided (free food!!).

See you in Patterson Park!