Join Us at the Annual Field Session in Maryland Archeology

By Charlie Hall, State Terrestrial Archeologistbiggs1

You are cordially invited to join the archeology staff of the Maryland Historical Trust in the investigation of two overlapping Late Woodland Native American village sites along Glade Creek in Walkersville, Maryland.  Mark your calendar now:  the Field Session begins on Friday May 22nd and ends on Monday June 1st, including weekends and the Memorial Day holiday.  You may choose to attend for half a day, a whole day, or any combination up to the entire 11 days.  Pre-registration is available through the Archeological Society of Maryland (www.marylandarcheology.org, click on Field Session).  We hope to see you there!

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Guest Blog – Bells Across the Land: Remembering Appomattox

 

By Nick Redding, Executive Director, Preservation Maryland

Bells Across the LandOn April 9, 1865, after four years of combat, the Civil War came to a symbolic end in the tiny hamlet of Appomattox, Virginia when Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant. The surrender at Appomattox signaled the end of the long, harsh conflict which ultimately claimed the lives of 750,000 individuals and led to the emancipation of the nearly 4.5 million enslaved African-Americans held in the southern states, including Maryland.

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Orlando Ridout V Field Survey Day

by Heather Barrett, Administrator of Research & Survey

Forgeman's House at Catoctin

Forgeman’s House at Catoctin

On October 9th, the Trust held its first Orlando Ridout V field survey day in honor of our friend, mentor, and cherished colleague.   It was a crisp fall day in the village of Catoctin in Frederick County, a kind of day Orlando would have enjoyed.   A large group of over 30 – past and present MHT staff members and our local guides – visited various historic buildings and sites throughout the district, including:  the 1774 Catoctin Furnace; several stone worker’s cottages; a slave cemetery undergoing archeological investigation; the ruins of the late eighteenth century Iron Master’s House; and, the grand ca. 1805 house of Baker Johnson, one of the furnace’s original owners.  Throughout the day, Elizabeth Comer, our tour guide and organizer, provided insight into the area’s rich history. Continue reading

In western Maryland, two African American cemeteries are witnesses to history

by Anne Raines, Capital Grants and Loans Program Administrator
Laboring Sons Memorial Ground

Laboring Sons Memorial Ground

Just up the hill from the main street of Sharpsburg is a modest one-room board and batten structure, neatly painted white and crowned by a small bell tower, standing watch over a small and well-tended cemetery.

About 20 miles away, in the center of the city of Frederick, a quiet acre serves as the final resting place of over 1,500 individuals, commemorated by a prominent granite marker.

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